Wednesday, June 25, 2014

Windows Azure SQL Database Backup and Restore strategy

Microsoft offers Windows Azure SQL Database as a cloud based SQL Server service offering. Though it has built-in features to protect data from server, network and device failures (reducing overhead for setting up and ensuring high availability) in certain cases you still need to protect your data from application or users errors. In this tip we cover how to setup a backup and restore strategy for a Windows Azure SQL Database. For more information click here.

Creating Power View Reports in Excel 2013

In my last tip, I talked about Power View, a new tool for intuitive ad hoc reporting which provides an interactive data exploration, visualization, and presentation experience to the business users. I demonstrated how you can configure and create Power View reports in SharePoint. In this tip we cover how to use Power View for Excel, click here. 

Getting started with Power View Reports with SharePoint, Excel and SQL Server

Microsoft Business Intelligence stack provides several tools for analyzing data from different perspectives, in different format and different ways. Power View is a new addition to this arsenal which provides intuitive ad hoc reporting capabilities for business users to provide an interactive data exploration, visualization, and presentation experience. But how does it work and how to get started with it? For information click here.

Getting started with the AMR tool for migration to SQL Server In-memory OLTP Tables

SQL Server 2014 introduces In-memory OLTP to create memory optimized tables for OLTP workloads to significantly improve performance and reduce processing time when you have a significant amount of memory and multi-core processors. But how do you decide which tables or stored procedures might benefit if migrated to In-memory OLTP and how much estimated work is required to migrate the objects? For more information click here.

SQL Server 2014 In Memory OLTP Durability, Natively Compiled Stored Procedures and Transaction Isolation Level

SQL Server 2014 will be released with an In-Memory OLTP feature for OLTP workloads to significantly improve performance and reduce processing time when you have a plentiful amount of memory and multi-core processors. In-memory OLTP allows you to create a memory optimized table which resides completely in memory and is resilient if the server crashes. But what about data durability of memory optimized tables? I heard there is new type of stored procedure which improves performance even further when working with memory optimized tables? What about transactions or isolation level support for these types of tables? For more information click here.

Overview of Applications, Indexes and Limitations for SQL Server 2014 In-Memory OLTP Tables

SQL Server 2014's In-Memory OLTP feature is intended to significantly improve performance and reduce processing time for servers with large amounts of memory and multi-core processors. What types of applications can take advantage of this new feature? What are the different types of indexes which can be created on memory optimized tables? Are there any considerations, restrictions or limitations? For information click here.

Getting started with Indexes on SQL Server Memory Optimized Tables

SQL Server 2014 introduces the In-memory OLTP engine which is fully integrated in SQL Server and allows you to create memory optimized tables. Data for these memory optimized tables gets stored in memory in a completely different structure than traditional disk based tables. But what about the indexes? What types of indexes can be created on memory optimized tables and when they can be used? How does this work? For more information click here.